About Microservices.io

Microservices.io is brought to you by Chris Richardson. Experienced software architect, author of POJOs in Action, the creator of the original CloudFoundry.com, and the author of Microservices patterns.

Chris helps clients around the world adopt the microservice architecture through consulting engagements, and training classes and workshops.

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LEARN about microservices

Chris offers numerous resources for learning the microservice architecture.

Training classes

Chris teaches comprehensive workshops and training classes for executives, architectures and developers to help your organization use microservices effectively.

Avoid the pitfalls of adopting microservices and learn essential topics, such as service decomposition and design and how to refactor a monolith to microservices.


Get the book: Microservices Patterns

Read Chris Richardson's book:

Example microservices applications

Want to see an example? Check out Chris Richardson's example applications. See code

BUILD microservices

Ready to start using the microservice architecture?

Consulting services

Engage Chris to create a microservices adoption roadmap and help you define your microservice architecture,


The Eventuate platform

Use the Eventuate.io platform to tackle distributed data management challenges in your microservices architecture.

Eventuate is Chris's latest startup. It makes it easy to use the Saga pattern to manage transactions and the CQRS pattern to implement queries.

ASSESS your architecture

Assess your application's microservice architecture and identify what needs to be improved.

Consulting services

Engage Chris to conduct an architectural assessment.


Self assessment

Alternatively, conduct a self-assessment using the Microservices Assessment Platform.


Join the microservices google group

Microservices adoption antipatterns

Many enterprise applications are large, complex monoliths that are developed by large teams that struggle to keep up with the needs of the business. Consequently, adopting the microservice architecture is an appealing option. As you might expect, migrating to microservices requires an enterprise to tackle numerous technology related challenges. But enterprises also encounter obstacles that have less to do with technology and more to do with strategy, process, and organization.

I’ve written series of blog posts about the microservices adoption anti-patterns that I have observed while working with numerous clients around the world. Unlike a regular pattern, which is a (problem, solution) pair, an anti-pattern consists of three elements:

  • Problem - the problem you are trying to solve, which in the case of microservices adoption is generally how to improve the speed, the frequency and reliability of software delivery
  • Anti-pattern solution - the solution that doesn’t work well
  • Refactored solution - a better solution to the problem.

Here are the microservices adoption antipatterns:

  • Microservices are a magic pixie dust - believing that a sprinkle of microservices will solve all of your development problems
  • Microservices as the goal - making the adoption of microservices the goal and measuring success in terms of the number of services written
  • Scattershot adoption - multiple application development teams attempt to adopt the microservice architecture without any coordination
  • Trying to fly before you can walk - attempting to adopt the microservice architecture (an advanced technique) without (or not committing to) practicing basic software development techniques, such as clean code, good design, and automated testing
  • Focussing on Technology - focussing on technology aspects of microservices, most commonly the deployment infrastructure, and neglecting key issues, such as service decomposition
  • More the merrier - intentionally creating a very fine-grained microservice architecture
  • Red Flag Law - retaining the same development process and organization structure that were used when developing monolithic applications.

To learn more

Avoiding the anti-patterns

Talk to me about my microservices consulting and training services including how I can help your organization avoid these anti-patterns by creating a microservices migration roadmap. In particular, I have a Microservices for leaders class


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